Providers of Opt-In Email Lists

If you haven't already read it, see our page about Optin Email Lists. Before you get to the List of Opt-In Email List Providers below, take a moment and read the next two sections in order to protect yourself. There are plenty of scammers selling lists that aren't Opt-In Email Lists.

Caveats

Anti-spam: We at Words in a Row are of the anti-spam persuasion, which is one reason we provide this list of vendors of opt-in email lists. Contradictory as that may seem (we've been blasted by anti-spammers for participating at all in this industry) our reasoning is this: We want marketers to be able to locate lists that ARE opt-in, so that they aren't tempted by and don't ever buy email addresses harvested from websites by robots or in some other way gathered without permission.

This old article on SearchEnginePeople is still valid—it lists the Top 5 lies that Scammers tell New Email Marketers.

Practical Advice to Get a Refund

Always pay for email services by credit card. That way you have some slight recourse through your credit card company if you later believe that you have been cheated. If a company will not take a credit card as payment, it is one reason not to do business with them—they are making it harder for you to get a refund if you believe at some point down the line that you deserve one.

If you believe you have a valid complaint against a company that has sent out email (or direct mail) for you, take the direct approach to resolving any service problem. Speak plainly and try not to upset the people you are dealing with. But outline that you are willing to take this to their exectives if necessary, and if that doesn't handle it, to the BBB, to file a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission and if that doesn't handle it, your lawyer will file a lawsuit in federal court. That's a gradient approach that can get results.

Speak to the salesman from whom you bought the service, then their manager and their delivery personnel, then start climbing their organization hierarchy until the problem is resolved. Always take good notes during those telephone calls. Send letters documenting any agreements reached to resolve the problem, and send copies of those letters to the top brass of the organization so they know there is (or was) a problem and can see how it is being handled by their staff. Typically those lower down in an organization will try to hide any service problems from their own executives, so the actual people who can handle your problem may not have any idea there IS a problem until they receive your certified letter.

If no joy comes from that approach, then the top brass IS the problem and you should contact the Better Business Bureau—BBB - File a Complaint. Although you'd think the Direct Marketing Association—DMA (part of the Association of National Advertisers)—would be helpful, in my experience they probably will not be much help. They are a trade organization organized to support mailing companies, not consumers.

You can file a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) as well. Here's the FTC's advice on what to do if you were scammed.

And don't forget that real two-way communication, where both parties actually sit still and listen to each other, is a tremendous solvent. In my experience, real two-way communication will resolve almost any business dispute, even those where parties are yelling at each other.

But also remember that some sales offers just don't work and it is not always the fault of the mailing list company. So be prepared to use different parts of the same list to test your offers so you can find one offer that works well for you. To see how this has been done for more than 100 years, read the classic book, Scientific Advertising by Claude C. Hopkins. The book is usually available through Amazon, and you can sometimes find it through Powells Used Book Store, or aLibris (both of those are great online bookstores).

Also be aware that most of these companies listed below have a $1000.00 minimum order.

Please note well: We DO NOT offer list brokerage services—this page is maintained for our own reference and available to the general public as a courtesy only. Please DO NOT send requests for us to locate specific lists for you. Instead, use this directory to contact the companies listed here and do your own research to find what you seek.

Optin Email List Providers

We make no claims or recommendations about any of these companies. Caveat Emptor!* Having maintained this list for over 20 years now, we can safely say that these companies come and go with alarming frequency.

How to use this page? Use the contact information below to send an email to each relevant individual company requesting the opt-in email list you want. Or use the phone numbers below to call them to speak with real humans.

If you know of any other brokers of opt-in email lists who should be included above, please let me know. I'll be happy to add them.

I hope this listing has been of use to you -- feel free to send me your comments. Note: I do not find lists for people like you, who are visiting this page. If you need a specific list, do the research yourself: visit the websites, email the people listed above, or call the resources listed and make the effort yourself to find what you need. That's why this page is made available to the general public. Good hunting!

~~ Jere Matlock

* Caveat Emptor is an old Latin expression meaning "Buyer Beware!" In other words, always protect yourself when dealing with these companies. We make no claims as to their reliability or trustworthiness.





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